Pressure Cooker Corned Beef and Vegetables

Corned Beef, vegetables (cabbage, onions, celery and carrots) cooked in a pressure cooker (Instant Pot or GoWise)

I originally made corned beef recipe for my co-workers for lunch (in a medical office break room), and it’s been in my regular rotation at home ever since. And something that makes my heart happy, I literally saw a grown man jump for joy when I mentioned I was making this today.

Pressure Cooking

Once you have the meat in and cooking, you have plenty of time to prepare your vegetables. When the meat is done and resting (covered), the vegetables get cooked through in that amazing broth (adding more flavor to it as well). I enjoy having a little bit of everything together, covered in broth, treating it like a soup. Others prefer the meat and vegetables separate. Either way, everyone is happy with their meal. If you have any leftovers (we rarely do), they reheat very well.

My Pressure Cookers

I usually use my 6 or 8 quart Instant Pot for this, but if I am doubling my recipe I will use my 12 quart GoWise USA. I use the Meat/Stew button on the devices, and then press the + button to 75 minutes (cut/quality of meat matter for this time setting, see notes below). This is a high pressure function. Placing a trivet/rack under the meat allows an easier time removing the meat, as it is very tender.

Slowly Releasing (Not Quick Release)

Once cooking has completed, I start releasing pressure slowly (not exactly quick release). If liquid starts coming out the release valve, I close it and wait an additional 30 seconds before releasing pressure again. I nudge the release valve being sealed until just releasing steam (you can use a cooking utensil to do this to keep your hand out of the way), rather than completely flipping the valve all the way to venting, this allows me to be able to control the venting a bit better. As the stream of steam declines, I nudge the valve more towards venting. If pressure releasing too fast starts to result in liquid coming out, I close valve for about 30 seconds, and then try again. This is about better controlling the pressure release than rapid/quick release, and does take longer to release.

Cut and Quality

Cut and quality matter in cooking time. Cheaper cuts seem to take longer and have much more fat (more than needed to flavor). I prefer premium flat cuts, with a thin layer of fat. I absolutely love the flavor and texture of Double R Ranch and Snake River Farm’s corned beef, which is local to Pacific Northwest. I have always had a consistent result with their product.

Corned Beef cooked in an Instant Pot, very moist, tender and flavorful

 

Pressure Cooker Corned Beef and Vegetables
I originally made this for my co-workers for lunch (in a medical office break room), and it's been in my regular rotation at home ever since. And something that makes my heart happy, I literally saw a grown man jump for joy when I mentioned I was making this recipe today.
Course: Main Course
Ingredients
  • 3-4 pounds corned beef flat cut used in this recipe (with spice packet, other cuts will take longer)
  • 4 cups of beef stock low-sodium or homemade, preferably
  • 1 pound of carrots peeled and divided (2 carrots for meat, remaining for vegetable mixture)
  • 2 onions quartered and divided (1 for meat, 1 for vegetable mixture)
  • 4 stalks celery cut into 1 inch segments and divided (2 for meat, 2 for vegetable mixture)
  • 10 garlic cloves
  • 1 pound of potatoes
  • 1 head of green cabbage
Instructions
Cook Meat
  1. Place trivet/rack insert into inner pot of electric pressure cooker. Place your corned beef on the trivet, sprinkle with accompanying spice packet. Add garlic, 2 of the carrots (each carrot cut into 2 inch segments), 1 of the onions, 2 stalks of the cut celery, and beef stock. Secure pressure cooker lid, ensuring valve is in sealed position. Press Meat/Stew program button, and increase cooking time to 75 minutes.
Prepare/Cook Vegetables
  1. While meat is cooking, prepare remaining vegetable mixture. Slice potatoes (I sliced them almost 1/2 inch thick). Cut cabbage into 1/8th sections, discarding the core. Cut carrots into 3 inch segments, then quarter lengthwise (into carrot spears). Prepare celery and onion, as described in ingredients list, if you haven't already. You can put it all of the vegetable mixture into one bowl, as they will all go in at the same time.
  2. After cooking time is complete, the device will switch to warm. Wait 15 minutes before starting to slowly release the pressure. If liquid starts to bubble out, reseal and wait for 30 seconds before starting to slowly release again (*see note about this below). Once pressure pin drops (indicating it is safe to open), slowly open the lid, never forcing it. Take cooked corned beef and any accompanying vegetables out of inner pot, using trivet/rack (I find 2 pasta servers or hot pan tongs work well for this). Place meat in large bowl and cover with foil, to rest.
  3. Remove the cooked vegetables from the cooking liquid and discard. Add uncooked vegetable mixture to cooking liquid. Close/seal lid of pressure cooker, and cook on high pressure for 5 minutes (for Instant Pot, you can press Manual and change time to 5 minutes). Once cooking has completed, start releasing pressure slowly (*see note about this below). If liquid starts coming out the release valve, close it and wait an additional 30 seconds before releasing pressure again.
Slice and serve
  1. Slice cooked corned beef on cutting board, against the grain of the meat. Serve with cooked vegetables and broth, to taste.
Recipe Notes

*Slow release notes: Nudge the release valve being sealed until just releasing steam (you can use a cooking utensil to do this to keep your hand out of the way), rather than completely flipping the valve all the way to venting, you are able to control the venting a bit better. As the stream of steam declines, nudge the valve more towards venting. If pressure releasing too fast starts to result in liquid coming out, close valve for about 30 seconds, then try again. This is about better controlling the pressure release than quick/rapid release, and is a compromise between quick release and natural pressure release.

Please also note that the cut of meat can effect cooking time, I used flat cut for this recipe. I find spending a little extra per pound for a piece that is not half fat is worth the money.

 

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